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With Peter Vuust (Prof. Neuroscience, Aarhus University), Jessie Cox (PhD Music, Columbia).
Fri, Sep 30 @ 03:00 PM   FREE   Center for Science & Society, 1180 Amsterdam Ave, 513 Fayerweather Hall
 
     
 
 
            
 
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Learn why certain types of music make us move more than others.

About this event
Musical rhythm has a remarkable capacity to move our minds & bodies. When we listen to Blame it on the Boogie by The Jacksons, it is difficult to refrain from tapping a foot or bobbing the head to the beat. This event will illustrate how the theory of predictive processing can help us understand how rhythm is processed & why we move to certain kinds of music more than others. Importantly, music is fundamentally a social phenomenon, in that we listen to, synchronize to, & make music together. This music interaction is typically based on agreeing on predictive structures such as meter or tonality. The speaker will discuss new studies showing how predictive coding can be applied to understand the dynamics involved in interpersonal synchronization using a minimal tapping paradigm, where two individuals are placed in separate rooms with headphones & EEG equipment & asked to tap together in different conditions.

Speakers

Peter Vuust, Professor of Neuroscience, Aarhus University; Professor of Music, Royal Academy of Music, Aarhus
Moderated by Jessie Cox, PhD Student in Music, Columbia University
Free & open to the public. Columbia University ID holders & invited guests may attend in person; others may attend on Zoom. Registration is required via Eventbrite. This event is part of the Comparing Domains of Improvisation series & sponsored by the Presidential Scholars in Society & Neuroscience program at Columbia University.

The Center for Science & Society makes every reasonable effort to accommodate individuals with disabilities. If you require disability accommodations to attend a Center for Science & Society event, please contact us at scienceandsociety@columbia.edu or (212) 853-1612 at least 10 days in advance of the event. For more information, please visit the campus accessibility webpage.
 
 
 
 
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